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Sysmess
The Read-only messaging service for networks

Updates and fixes

Version 3.2

  • User messages can be read from the message folder <domain controller>\SYSMESS\<username>.usr as an alternative to the root of the user's home folder. This allows Sysmess to function on networks where users do not all have their own home folders and also allows non-Administrators to create messages for individual users.
  • Sysmess is now compatible with DFS on Active Directory domains.  Previously, Sysmess assumed that the domain controller holding the PDC emulator role would always be available.

Version 3.0

  • Sysmess adds itself to the System Tray instead of the Taskbar.
  • Sysmess can display group and station messages in addition to user and public messages.

Please contact us if you would like to upgrade to version 3.2. This will be free for recent purchasers.


Frequently asked questions

You get a message telling you that a DLL is not initializing or available when running Sysmess.

The wrong DLLs are being loaded by the program. Ensure that you are running the correct versions of each program for the relevant operating system. Each program looks for the DLL files in the Windows system directory, the program directory and then current working directory. It is possible that you have the wrong DLLs in the wrong directory. If in doubt delete all FLOLIB*.DLL files and reinstall the workstation files.

This problem can only occur with version 2.0 or later.

When I run Sysmess, why does nothing seem to happen?

With version 1.2 or earlier, Sysmess defaulted to displaying only the current messages and not to continue looking for further messages. To make Sysmess continue looking use the command line parameter /REPEAT:x where x is a value between 10 and 60 and represents the number of seconds between each attempt to look for messages.

With version 2.0 or later, the default setting has been changed so that new messages are checked for every 60 seconds.

 
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